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Past Visiting Scholars (2009–2010)

Daniel AmsterdamAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; B.A., Yale University. The Roaring Metropolis: Business, Civic Welfare, and State Expansion in 1920s America. A study recasting the 1920s as a moment of aggressive governmental expansion that hinges primarily on the interrogation of urban politics, corporate political activism and the introduction of a new analytic framework, the civic welfare state. Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor, School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Tech University.

Deborah BecherAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Ph.D., Princeton University; B.A., University of Virginia. Valuing Property: Eminent Domain for Private Redevelopment, Philadelphia 1992-2007. A study of Philadelphia’s recent use of eminent domain, revealing how difficult decisions about economic management are made, challenging existing notions of what citizens expect from government, and exploring the tensions between the public and private dimensions of property. Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor of Sociology, Barnard College.

Angus BurginAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Ph.D., Harvard University; A.B., Harvard University. The Return of Laissez-Faire. A transatlantic history of free-market ideas and the institutions that supported them, focusing on the economists in the decades following the onset of the Great Depression who helped to create a theoretical framework for the revival of conservatism in American politics. Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University.

Dawn ColemanAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Assistant Professor of English, University of Tennessee. Ph.D., Stanford University; M.T.S., Harvard Divinity School; B.A., University of California, Los Angeles. Preaching and the Rise of the American Novel. A project on the intersection of Protestant preaching and literary culture in the nineteenth century, considering a range of antebellum authors who sought to capture for novels the spiritual authority of the pulpit. Current Affiliation: Associate Professor of English, University of Tennessee.

Jason PetrulisAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Ph.D., Columbia University; A.B., Harvard University. Marketing the American Way, 1932-1950. An examination of how the U.S. government policy intersected with corporate marketing to mobilize Americans for World War II and the early Cold War through “idea advertising,” a process that used marketing techniques to sell ideas about companies, people, and even nations. Current Affiliation: Visiting Assistant Professor of History, Oberlin College.

Jamie PietruskaAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; A.B., Brown University. Propheteering: A Cultural History of Prediction in the Gilded Age. An analysis of changing practices and perceptions of prediction in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America, including weather prediction, agricultural forecasting, fortune-telling and spiritualism, and utopian literature. Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor of History, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Associate Scholars

Crystal FeimsterAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Assistant Professor of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ph.D., Princeton University; B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Sexual Warfare: Rape and the American Civil War. A study describing how sexual violence during the Civil War and the decades that followed went beyond the immediate effects of the physical attack and had long-lasting political and social consequences. Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor of African American Studies and American Studies, Yale University.

Andrew JewettAffiliation during Fellowship Year: Assistant Professor of History and Social Studies, Harvard University. Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; B.A., University of California, Berkeley. Against the Technostructure: Critics of Scientism since the New Deal. An exploration of the political meanings attributed to science by mid-twentieth-century critics of American liberalism. Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor of History, Harvard University.

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