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Breaking the Code Panel Discussion of Alan Turing's Professional and Personal Life

House of the Academy
Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Panel Discussion of Alan Turing's Professional and Personal Life

Click Audio or Video for individual recordings.

INTRODUCTION
Alan Lightman is a novelist, essayist, physicist, and educator. He is Adjunct Professor of Humanities, Creative Writing, and Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was the first professor at MIT to receive a joint appointment in the sciences and the humanities. In his scientific work, Lightman has focused on relativistic gravitation theory, the structure and behavior of accretion disks, stellar dynamics, radiative processes, and relativistic plasmas. His essays, short fiction, and reviews on science and the human side of science have appeared in the Smithsonian Magazine, The American Scholar, The Atlantic Monthly, Daedalus, Discover, Harper's, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times, among other publications. His novel, Einstein's Dreams, was an international bestseller and his novel, The Diagnosis, was a finalist for the National Book Award. He cofounded the Kennedy Center American College Theater Award for a play about science. In 2004, he cofounded the Catalyst Collaborative @ MIT, a collaboration between Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Underground Railway Theater that aims to convey science and the culture of science through theater. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 1996. Audio | Video (5 min.)
 
SPEAKERS:
Laurence Senelick is the Director of Graduate Studies and Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University. His research interests include Russian theatre and drama, history of popular entertainment, gender and performance, history of directing, and classical theory. Senelick is the author or editor of more than twenty-five books, including Gender and Performance and A Historical Dictionary of Russian Theatre. Senelick has been named a Distinguished Scholar by both the American Society of Theatre Research and the Faculty Research Council of Tufts University. He has received the Barnard Hewitt Award of the American Society for Theatre Research for The Chekhov Theatre; the George Freedley Award of the Theatre Library Association for The Age and Stage of George L. Fox and The Changing Room: Sex, Drag and Theater; and the George Jean Nathan Award for best dramatic criticism of 2000. He holds the St. George Medal of the Russian Ministry of Culture for services to Russian art and scholarship. He has acted and directed with such organizations as the Loeb Drama Center, the Boston Lyric Opera, and Boston Baroque. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 2010. Audio | Video (9 min.)
Ronald L. Rivest is the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), a member of the lab’s Theory of Computation Group and a founder of its Cryptography and Information Security Group. Rivest’s research interests include cryptography, computer and network security, voting systems, and algorithms. Among his awards he was a co-winner of the 2000 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award, the 2002 ACM Turing Award, and the 2009 NEC C&C Prize. He is a recipient of the Secure Computing Lifetime Achievement Award and the MITX Lifetime Achievement Award; in 2007, he received both the Computers, Freedom and Privacy Conference Distinguished Innovator Award and the Marconi Prize. Rivest has served as a Director of the International Association for Cryptologic Research and as a Director of the Financial Cryptography Association. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and the International Association for Cryptographic Research. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 1993. Audio | Video (7 min.)
Shafi Goldwasser is the RSA Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Professor of Computer Science and Applied Math-ematics at Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. She is also a co-leader of the cryptography and information security group and a member of the complexity theory group within the Theory of Computation Group and the Laboratory for Computer Science at MIT. Goldwasser’s interests include complexity theory, number theory, and cryptography. She is known for her work on interactive and zero-knowledge proofs. Goldwasser has twice won the Gödel Prize in theoretical computer science (1993 and 2001). She is also the recipient of the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award (1996), the RSA Mathematics Award (1998), the Athena Lecturer Award of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Committee on Women in Computing (2008-2009), the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science (2010), and the Emanuel Piore Award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (2011). She is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the International Association for Cryptologic Research. She was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 2001. Audio | Video (10 min.)
Silvio Micali is Ford Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has been a professor of computer science since 1983. He is also co-founder and co-leader of the Information and Computer Security Group. His scientific interests include complexity-based pseudorandom generation and cryptography, interactive and computationally sound proofs, zero knowledge, secure protocols, and mechanism design. He is best known for some of his fundamental early work on public-key cryptosystems, pseudorandom functions, digital signatures, oblivious transfer, and secure multiparty computation, and is one of the co-inventors of zero-knowledge proofs. His many awards include the Gödel Prize in theoretical computer science (1993), the RSA Mathematics Award (2004), and the University of California Berkeley Computer Science Division: Distinguished Alumni Award (2006). He is an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the International Association for Cryptologic Research. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy in 2003. Audio | Video (12 min.)

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