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Recommended Reading

Framing the Problem: Polling Data on Science and the Public

Americans, Politics and Science Issues.” July 1, 2015. Pew Research Center.

How Different Groups Think about Scientific Issues.” 2015. Pew Research Center.

How Scientists Engage the Public.” 2015. Pew Research Center.

National Science Board. 2016. “Chapter 7. Science and Technology: Public Attitudes and Understanding.” Science and Engineering Indicators 2016. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation (NSB-2016-1).

Poll Results: Science.” 2016. YouGov/Huffington Post.

Public and Scientists’ Views on Science and Society.” 2015. Pew Research Center.

The Internet as a Resource for News and Information about Science.” 2006. Pew Research Center.

Framing the Problem: Research and Commentary on Public Trust in Science

Andersson, Ulrika. 2015. Does Media Coverage of Research Misconduct Impact on Public Trust in Science? A Study of News Reporting and Confidence in Research in Sweden 2002–2013. Observatorio 9 (4): 15–30.

Dijkgraaf, Robbert. 2016. Are There Barbarians at the Gates of Science? Nautilus

Fiske, Susan T., and Cydney Dupree. 2014. Gaining Trust as Well as Respect in Communicating to Motivated Audiences about Science Topics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (Supplement 4): 13593–97.

Gawande, Atul. June 10, 2016. “The Mistrust of Science.” The New Yorker.

Jamieson, Kathleen Hall. May 12, 2015. “Toward a Common Understanding of Trust in Science.” National Research Council of the National Academies.

Leiserowitz, Anthony, et al. 2013. Climategate, Public Opinion, and the Loss of Trust. American Behavioral Scientist 57 (6): 818–37.

Master, Zubin and Resnik, David. 2013. “Hype and Public Trust in Science.” Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2): 321–35.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Trust and Confidence at the Interfaces of the Life Sciences and Society: Does the Public Trust Science? A Workshop Summary. The National Academies Press.

Twenge, Jean M., W. Keith Campbell, and Nathan T. Carter. 2014. Declines in Trust in Others and Confidence in Institutions among American Adults and Late Adolescents, 1972–2012. Psychological Science.

Considerations for the Scientific Community: the Practice and Portrayal of Research

Alberts, Bruce, Cicerone, Ralph J., Fienberg, Stephen E., Kamb, Alexander, McNutt, Marcia Nerem, Robert M., Schekman, McNutt, Shiffrin, Richard, Stodden, Victoria, Suresh, Subra, Zuber, Maria T., Pope, Barbara Kline, and Jamieson, Kathleen Hall. 2015. Self-Correction in Science at Work. Science 348 (6242): 1420–22.

Aschwanden, Christie, and Koerth-Baker, Maggie. April 7, 2016. “How Two Grad Students Uncovered an Apparent Fraud – And a Way to Change Opinions on Transgender Rights.” FiveThirtyEight.

Carey, Benedict and Belluck, Pam. May 25, 2015. “Doubts About Study of Gay Canvassers Rattle the Field.” The New York Times.

Fischhoff, Baruch, and Alex L. Davis. 2014. Communicating Scientific Uncertainty. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111 (Supplement 4): 13664–71.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Science Literacy: Concepts, Contexts, and Consequences. The National Academies Press.

Shtulman, Andrew. 2015. How Lay Cognition Constrains Scientific Cognition. Philosophy Compass 10 (11): 785–98.

Su, Leona Yi-Fan, Cacciatore, Michael A., Scheufele, Dietram A., Brossard, Dominique and Xenos, Michael A. 2014. “Inequalities in Scientific Understanding: Differentiating Between Factual and Perceived Knowledge Gaps.” Science Communication 36 (3): 352–78.

Politics, Ideology, and Social Factors

Gauchat, Gordon. 2012. Politicization of Science in the Public Sphere: A Study of Public Trust in the United States, 1974 to 2010. American Sociological Review 77 (2): 167–87.

Gauchat, Gordon. 2015. The Political Context of Science in the United States: Public Acceptance of Evidence-Based Policy and Science Funding. Social Forces 94 (2): 723–746.

Hecht, David K. February 21, 2016. “How Scientific Celebrity Hurts Science.” The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Ho, Shirley S., Brossard, Dominique, and Scheufele, Dietram A. 2008. Effects of Value Predispositions, Mass Media Use, and Knowledge on Public Attitudes Toward Embryonic Stem Cell Research. International Journal of Public Opinion Research 20 (2): 171–92.

Kahan, Dan M. 2015. The Politically Motivated Reasoning Paradigm. Emerging Trends in Social & Behavioral Sciences.

Leiserowitz, Anthony, et al. 2011. Global Warming’s Six Americas, May 2011. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

Lupia, Arthur. 2013. Communicating Science in Politicized Environments. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110 (Supplement 3): 14048–54.

Lupia, Arthur. 2016. Uninformed: Why People Know So Little About Politics and What We Can Do About It. New York: Oxford University Press.

Nisbet, Matthew and Markowitz, Ezra. 2015. Expertise in an Age of Polarization: Evaluating Scientists’ Political Awareness and Communication Behaviors. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 658 (1): 136–54.

Nisbet, Matthew and Markowitz, Ezra. 2014. Understanding Public Opinion in Debates over Biomedical Research: Looking beyond Political Partisanship to Focus on Beliefs about Science and Society. PLoS ONE 9 (2): e88473.

Nyhan, Brendan. July 5, 2014. “When Beliefs and Facts Collide.” The New York Times: The Upshot.

Science Communication and Journalism

Jamieson, Kathleen Hall. Fall 2015. “Communicating the Value and Values of Science.” Issues in Science and Technology 32 (1).

Jamieson, Kathleen Hall. April 28, 2015. “Communicating the Value and Values of Science.” The Henry and Bryna David Endowment Lecture at the National Academy of Sciences.

Kahan, Dan M. 2015. What is the “science of science communication”? Journal of Science Communication 14 (3).

Kahan, Dan M. 2013. A Risky Science Communication Environment for Vaccines. Science 342 (6154): 53–54.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Communicating Science Effectively: A Research Agenda. The National Academies Press.

Nisbet, Matthew and Fahy, Declan. 2015. The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism in Politicized Science Debates. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 658 (1): 223–34.

Nisbet, Matthew and Markowitz, Ezra. 2016. “Americans’ Attitudes about Science and Technology: The Social Context for Public Communication.” AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute. Washington, D.C.: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Nisbet, Matthew and Markowitz, Ezra. 2016. “Science Communication Research: Bridging Theory and Practice.” AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute. Washington, D.C.: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Nyhan, Brendan, et al. February 2014. Effective Messages in Vaccine Promotion: A Randomized Trial. Pediatrics 113(4).

Simis, Molly J., Madden, Haley, Cacciatore, Michael A., and Sara K. Yeo. 2016. “The Lure of Rationality: Why Does the Deficit Model Persist in Science Communication?Public Understanding of Science 25 (4): 400–414.

Sumner, Petroc, et al. 2014. The Association between Exaggeration in Health Related Science News and Academic Press Releases: Retrospective Observational Study. BMJ 349.

Emerging Sources of Scientific Information

Brossard, Dominique, and Scheufele, Dietram A. 2013. Science, New Media, and the Public. Science 339 (6115): 40–41.

Yeo, Sara K. 2015. “Public Engagement with and Communication of Science in a Web-2.0 Media Environment.” AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute. American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Runge, Kristin K., Yeo, Sara K., Cacciatore, Michael, Scheufele, Dietram A., Brossard, Dominique, Xenos, Michael, et al. 2013. “Tweeting Nano: How Public Discourses about Nanotechnology Develop in Social Media Environments.” Journal of Nanoparticle Research 15 (1): 1–11.

Additional content, released by the American Academy, related to the studies pursued by The Public Face of Science project

Consensus & Controversy in Science: Genes, GMOs & Climate: Stated Meeting of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

  • Featured speakers: Randy Schekman (University of California, Berkeley), Nicholas Dirks (University of California, Berkeley), Jennifer Doudna (University of California, Berkeley), Richard Muller (University of California, Berkeley), and Pamela Ronald (University of California, Davis; Joint Bioenergy Institute)

Scientific Advances and their Impact on Society: Stated Meeting of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

  • Featured speakers: John Evans (University of California, San Diego), Lawrence Goldstein (University of California, San Diego School of Medicine), J. Craig Venter (Human Longevity, Inc.), Jonathan F. Fanton (American Academy), Gordon Gill (University of California, San Diego School of Medicine)

Water: California in a Global Context

  • Featured speakers include: Christopher B. Field (Carnegie Institution for Science; Stanford University); Anna M. Michalak (Carnegie Institution for Science; Stanford University); Joya Banerjee (Stephen D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation); Holly Doremus (UC Berkeley School of Law); Isha Ray (University of California, Berkeley); Annie Maxwell (Skoll Global Threats Fund)

Innovation: An American Imperative

American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 2014. Public Trust in Vaccines: Defining a Research Agenda. Cambridge, MA: American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Kennedy, Donald and Overholser, Geneva (Eds.). 2010. Science and the Media. Cambridge, MA: American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Mooney, Chris. 2010. “Do Scientists Understand the Public?” Cambridge, MA: American Academy of Arts and Sciences.