Winter 2003

On International Justice

Editor
James Miller
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On International Justice


The challenge of global justice now 
by Anthony Lewis

Compassion & terror
by Martha C. Nussbaum

World governance: beyond utopia
by Stanley Hoffmann

What human rights mean
by Charles Beitz

The limits of idealism
by Jack Goldsmith & Stephen D. Krasner

Coercive justice
by Jean Bethke Elshtain

Atrocity & legalism
by Gary J. Bass

Everyday global governance
by Anne-Marie Slaughter

The case for a UN force 
by Carl Kaysen & George Rathjens


Poetry & Fiction


The Institute by John Hollander

Exchanges by Mary Morris


Notes


Wendy L. Freedman on the age of the universe 

Daniel C. Dennett on failures of freedom & the fear of science

Bonnie Costello on poetry & the idea of nature

Image:
The spiral galaxy Messier 100 is one of the brightest members of the Virgo Cluster, which is the closest cluster of galaxies to our galaxy, the Milky Way, containing more than two thousand spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies. Embedded within its majestic spiral arms are myriads of newly formed stars, some of which are the rare, luminous stars known as Cepheid variables. This picture is a combination of images from the FORS instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory in Chile, taken with red (R), green (V) and blue (B) filters. Image courtesy of the European Southern Observatory. A true color image of Messier 100 (M100), a spiral galaxy within the nearest massive cluster of galaxies, the Virgo cluster. Embedded within its majestic spiral arms are myriads of newly formed stars, some of which are the rare, luminous stars known as Cepheid variables. The high resolution afforded by the Hubble Space Telescope allows astronomers to measure Cepheids to much greater distances than previously possible. See Wendy L. Freedman on The age of the universe, pages 122–126. Image © nasa and Space Telescope Science Institute (stsci).
Image:
The spiral galaxy Messier 100 is one of the brightest members of the Virgo Cluster, which is the closest cluster of galaxies to our galaxy, the Milky Way, containing more than two thousand spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies. Embedded within its majestic spiral arms are myriads of newly formed stars, some of which are the rare, luminous stars known as Cepheid variables. This picture is a combination of images from the FORS instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory in Chile, taken with red (R), green (V) and blue (B) filters. Image courtesy of the European Southern Observatory. A true color image of Messier 100 (M100), a spiral galaxy within the nearest massive cluster of galaxies, the Virgo cluster. Embedded within its majestic spiral arms are myriads of newly formed stars, some of which are the rare, luminous stars known as Cepheid variables. The high resolution afforded by the Hubble Space Telescope allows astronomers to measure Cepheids to much greater distances than previously possible. See Wendy L. Freedman on The age of the universe, pages 122–126. Image © nasa and Space Telescope Science Institute (stsci).