Winter 2008

On Life

Editor
James Miller
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Image:
Tomb of Cappucin monks in the Roman catacombs, in a photograph from the nineteenth century. Etruscans had buried their dead in underground chambers, a practice revived by early Christians; after 380, when Christianity became the state religion of Rome, the dead were increasingly buried in church cemeteries. See Shai Lavi on "How Dying Became a ‘Life Crisis’": “The problem of dying dates back . . . to the emergence of a wish for an intelligible hope in the face of a hopeless existence.” Image © Bettmann/Corbis.
Tomb of Cappucin monks in the Roman catacombs, in a photograph from the nineteenth century.
Image:
Tomb of Cappucin monks in the Roman catacombs, in a photograph from the nineteenth century. Etruscans had buried their dead in underground chambers, a practice revived by early Christians; after 380, when Christianity became the state religion of Rome, the dead were increasingly buried in church cemeteries. See Shai Lavi on "How Dying Became a ‘Life Crisis’": “The problem of dying dates back . . . to the emergence of a wish for an intelligible hope in the face of a hopeless existence.” Image © Bettmann/Corbis.