Figure

V-03a: Share of Children Who Read for Fun, by Age, 1984–2012*

* Not every interyear difference is statistically significant. See the supporting table for details.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, Table 221.30, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d14/tables/dt14_221.30.asp?current=ye, accessed 11/15/2015.

“In addition to assessing student achievement in various subjects, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) collects information from students, teachers, and schools in order to provide a more complete understanding of the results and overall student performance. This information is collected through the following: Student questionnaires collect information on students’ demographic characteristics, classroom experiences, and educational support. Teacher questionnaires gather data on teacher training and instructional practices. School questionnaires gather information on school policies and characteristics. The results of these questionnaires help to provide contextual information for the assessments, as well as information about factors that may be related to students’ learning. These results can be analyzed using the NAEP Data Explorer: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/naepdata.” (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, An Introduction to NAEP, NCES 2010-468 [Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2010]).

As part of the student questionnaire, administered as part of the NAEP long-term trend assessment (LTT) in reading, nine-, 13-, and 17-year-olds were asked the following question about their personal reading practices: "How often do you read for fun on your own time?". The possible responses were: "almost every day"; "once or twice a week"; "once or twice a month"; "a few times a year"; or "never or hardly ever." 

 

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