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Language courses in the nation’s elementary and secondary schools are opportunities for English-speaking students to acquire the foundation on which advanced study and true fluency in another language is built. The most recent data reveal a downward trend in the share of schools offering courses in languages other than English (LOTE) but an increase in the share of secondary students pursuing such learning opportunities, particularly at a higher level.

I-11c: Public K–12 Enrollment in Languages Other than English, by State, Academic Year 2014–2015

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Source: American Councils for International Education, American Council on the Teaching for Foreign Languages, Center for Applied Linguistics, and Modern Language Association, The National K–16 Foreign Language Enrollment Report 2014–15 (Washington, D.C.: American Councils for International Education, 2016), http://www.americancouncils.org/national-k-16-foreign-language-enrollment-report.

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* Arabic was excluded from the calculations on which this indicator is based because reliable estimates of the share of graduates who had earned credit in this language could not be obtained. The language categories used in the graph are not mutually exclusive (e.g., a student who earned Spanish credit could also have earned credit in another language; he or she would be included in the estimated percentage of both Spanish and “Other”).
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, Table 225.70, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d14/tables/dt14_225.70.asp, accessed 11/15/2015.

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* “LOTE” stands for languages other than English. Arabic was excluded from the calculations on which this indicator is based because a reliable estimate of the share of graduates who had earned credit in this language could not be obtained. Percentages do not add to 100% due to rounding.
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, Table 225.70, http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d14/tables/dt14_225.70.asp, accessed 11/15/2015.

Some students earned credit for more than one language, and thus the units depicted in the graph are not high school graduates but rather instances of earned credit in a given language among those graduates.

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